Pelvic Health Therapy

Pelvic Health Physiotherapy begins with an assessment of the patient’s condition. This assessment typically includes a medical history review and a physical examination. Often, the medical history review is considered a subjective examination, while the physical exam is considered objective. Both elements are important to successfully examining and treating the patient. The assessment stage may, in some cases, involve diagnostic tests to better evaluate the patient’s condition and develop an effective treatment plan.

Many people with pelvic pain have pelvic floor dysfunction, but specifically hypertonic muscles, or muscles that are too tight.  The pelvic floor muscles are a group of muscles that attach to the front, back and sides of the pelvic bone and sacrum.  They are like a hammock or a sling, and they support the bladder, uterus, prostate and rectum.  They also wrap around your urethra, rectum, and vagina (in women).

These muscles must be able to contract to maintain continence and relax to allow for urination, bowel movements, and in women, sexual intercourse.

When these muscles have too much tension (hypertonic) they will often cause pelvic pain or urgency and frequency of the bladder and bowels.  When they are low-tone (hypotonic) they will contribute to stress incontinence and organ prolapse.


Our Pelvic Health Physiotherapists treat a wide range of conditions

  • Incontinence
  • Prolapse
  • Sacroiliac Dysfunction
  • Pudendal nerve irritation
  • Interstitial cystitis
  • Persistent pelvic pain
  • Painful intercourse
  • Constipation
  • Pelvic floor muscle tightness and muscle imbalance

Pelvic floor dysfunction is diagnosed by specially trained doctors and physiotherapists by using internal and external “hands-on” or manual techniques to evaluate the function of the pelvic floor muscles.  They will also assess your ability to contract and relax these muscles.  Your bones and muscles of your lower back, hips and sacro-iliac joints will need to be assessed as well since these joints can stress your pelvic floor muscles.

If an internal examination is too painful, the connective tissue of your abdomen, thighs, groins and low back are often very tight.  The connective tissue forms the container of the muscles, and this tissue often needs to be relaxed before any internal work can be done.

When your pelvic floor muscles are tight and weak, the tension is treated before the weakness.  Once the muscles have reached a normal resting tone, and are able to relax fully, their strength is reassessed and strengthening exercises are prescribed, if appropriate.

 

Initial Visit : $120
Follow up visits: $85-100